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Ohio-PA cross-border beer collaboration coming soon

Cleveland's Buckeye Brewing and Pittsburgh's Rivertowne Brewing Co.  have teamed up to create OH-PA, an India Pale Ale.

Ed Thompkins, beer and wine buyer for Heinen's, came up with the idea and – as is his nature – acted as an intermediary of sorts between the brewers.

While the cities' football fans often are at odds, the brewers had no problem showing a congenial spirit of détente.

"Everything was great," Buckeye Brewing's Garin Wright said. "They have a kick-ass (brewing) system. It's much more automated. It was fun being there and being a part of collaborating on the recipe design. ... And they're great people. The city is cool and everyone in that brewery is kind of down to earth."

The joint-effort beer, Thompkins said, is a 4.8 percent alcohol sessionable IPA. Wright describes it as "unfiltered – we're going to try to keep all that hop character in the can. It's pretty much coming out of the tank fresh and into the can, and it will be dry-hopped twice." Dry hopping is a process where certain hops are added at varying times during fermentation to enhance a beer's aroma.

Wright said he hopes to start selling the beer at Buckeye Brewing on Tuesday, Feb. 18.


Original source: The Plain Dealer
Read the complete story here.

Photographer paints portrait of PA Rust Belt town in 'Homesteading'

Noted local photographer Zoe Strauss -- of "Under I-95" fame -- has a new project, 'Homesteading,' that examines life in a post-steel mill town.

“Homesteading” combines landscapes, street photography and formal studio portraits to explore over generations the history of those who built Andrew Carnegie’s wealth, the ways their fates were intertwined and the current lives of Homestead’s residents. After a year of research, she found it daunting to blend themes of globalization, a mythic past and the trauma of that past in a mundane 21st-century community. She actually felt she had reached the limits of what she could do with photography. So, she did what she always does when overwhelmed: Let strangers show her the way...

Ms. Strauss is not your typical Magnum photographer — she describes herself as a lesbian anarchist from Philadelphia and is unfailingly humble. She is interested as much by theory as by photographic practice, and she loves and is influenced by science fiction, art theory and epic poetry.


Original source: New York Times' Lens blog
Read the complete story here.

Chicago Tribune travel writer gives Pittsburgh a rave

A writer from the Chicago Tribune feel in love with the spirit of Pittsburgh -- calling it one of America's most underrated cities.

New York, San Francisco and Portland, Ore., are wonderful cities that can't resist preening when passing mirrors to remind themselves just how wonderful they are. Pittsburgh is a wonderful city that doesn't even see the mirror. It just turns to its buddies and says, "Hey, yinz guys, let's go have a beer..."

Steeped in spirit and flavor, Pittsburgh can lay claim to being one of our nation's most underrated cities, with a beauty as breathtaking as it is obvious. The drive from Pittsburgh International Airport follows an unspectacular 20 miles of rolling-hills suburbia along Interstate Highway 376 and then, after a brief trip through the Fort Pitt Tunnel — bam! — there is Pittsburgh...

The city has embraced food, drink and art while long-quiet neighborhoods have been infused with fresh bustle. The fascinating downtown — a strange but appealing mix of architecture built up through the decades — sports fresh touches of its own, like the dim, marble-barred gastropub Meat and Potatoes, which I checked out on a Thursday evening with a couple of natives.


Original source: The Chicago Tribune
Read the complete story here.
 

Steelers fan files injunction against San Diego Chargers' inclusion in the playoffs

A (very angry) Mercer, PA, man has fired an injunction alleging that a missed call cost his Steelers a spot in the NFL playoffs -- and gave one to the Chargers. He named the NFL and Commissioner Roger Goodell, and demanded a jury trial.

Officials in that game failed to call an illegal alignment formation on the Chargers that would have allowed Kansas City kicker Ryan Succop a re-kick of a 41-yard field goal he missed with eight seconds remaining. Had he made the kick, San Diego's loss would have sent the Pittsburgh Steelers to the postseason as the final wild-card team.

Instead, San Diego won in overtime and then beat the favored Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. The Chargers face the AFC's top-seeded Denver Broncos this Sunday.

In the filing, Spuck suggested some possible remedies for the missed call. The NFL could suspend the playoffs for a week to 10 days, allow Succop to re-kick the field goal, or let the Steelers play the Chargers at a neutral site to determine who plays on.


The Sun has the whole complaint.

Original source: The Baltimore Sun
Read the complete story here.

Want bars and pizza? Pittsburgh is tops in the U.S.

Pittsburgh ranked No.1 and No. 2, respectively, on the lists of top U.S. cities for pizza and bars, reports InfoGroup.

Many of the cities with a high concentration of bars compared to population also lead the list of pizza restaurants per capita. These cities were most often found in Rust Belt cities and towns housing large breweries. Pittsburgh leads the list, with 12 bars per 10,000 residents. Cities famous for pizza, such as New York and Chicago, don’t appear in the top five in that category. Orlando, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Buffalo top the list, all with at least seven pizza parlors per 10,000 in population.
 
Original source: InfoGroup
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Another Pittsburgh love letter

Lancaster County-bred Allison Bustin, a volunteer coordinator, writes in Huffington Post about her deep affection for Pittsburgh.
 
This is my city. Not by birth, I was born in Baltimore, but my family is from West Virginia, and Pittsburgh is the big city. I came here for the first time when I was 18 to visit and tour the University of Pittsburgh. It was December. It wasn't snowing, but everything and everyone was apocalyptically pale and frosted. A pathfinder took my Mom and me around campus. We were happy to walk, just to stay warm. The wind didn't do the Pathfinder any favors, but I didn't need to hear anything anyway. I was set on Pitt in a second. It was the furthest away that I could get from home & still pay in-state tuition, and it was beautiful even on such an ugly day.
 
Original source: Huffington Post
Read the full story here.
 

Erie No. 2, Pittsburgh No. 8 on most recent snowiest cities list

Erie dropped from the top spot to No. 2 and Pittsburgh held steady at No. 8 on the annual list of snowiest cities in the U.S., according to Golden Snow Globe.
 
(City, Population, 2013-2014 Snowfall Totals / Average Snow to Date)
 
1-5) Billings, Mon. (104,170) 17.3 12.2
 
2-1) Erie, Pa. (101,786) 15.6 9.9
 
3-2) Syracuse, N.Y. (145,170) 14.5 11.6
 
4-3) Rochester, N.Y. (210,565) 13.5 8.4
 
5-4) Anchorage, Alaska (291,826) 11.2 22.5
 
6-6) Akron, Ohio (199,110) 10.7 3.9
 
7-7) Buffalo, New York (261,310) 10.0 10.0
 
8-8) Pittsburgh,Pa (305,704) 9.4 3.1
 
9-9) South Bend, Indiana (101,168) 9.2 5.9
 
10-10) Sioux Falls, S.D. (153,888) 7.9 9.2

Original source: Golden Snow Globe
Read the full story here.

Pittsburg ranks No. 5 among best cities for retirement

Livability ranks Pittsburgh No. 5 on its list of America's best cities in which to retire.
 
The city scored well in hospitals and cultural engagement. The Pittsburgh metro area has 43 hospitals, and among those eight are top ranked by U.S. News & World Report. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the highest-rated hospital in the city, is nationally ranked in 15 specialties, including geriatrics, neurology and pulmonology.
 
Original source: Livability
Read the full story here.
 

Smart innovation policies mean clean energy rebirth for Pittsburgh

Smart innovation policies lead to Pittsburgh's clean energy rebirth, reports The Energy Collective.
 
The result of Innovation Works’ focus – and the focus of the city of Pittsburgh in general – on energy innovation is its status as an emerging clean tech hub. According to the Brookings Metropolitan Policy program, as of 2010, Pittsburgh was ranked in the top 25 in the United States for its clean economy growth. Its fastest growing industry segments included solar PV, pollution reduction technologies, and green buildings.
 
Original source: The Energy Colective
Read the full story here.
 

Consol sells coal mines, shifts focus to natural gas

Pittsburgh-based Consol Energy sold five of its coal mines to focus more on natural gas and coal exports, reports The New York Times.
 
Nicholas J. DeIuliis, president of the company, which is based in Pittsburgh, said in a conference call with reporters that the five mines being sold to the privately held Murray Energy in the transaction, worth $3.5 billion to $4.4 billion, were “a very profitable business, a very stable business.”
 
But although they historically represent the center of the 150-year-old company’s business, they have limited growth potential, he said. 
 
Original source: The New York Times
Read the full story here.
 

A road trip to Randyland, North Side Pittsburgh's bright spot

Roadside America checks in at Randyland, an offbeat North Side Pittsburgh attraction.

The neighborhood's revival is due, in some significant part, to Randy, who began planting guerrilla mini-gardens in the community in the early 1980s (They now number in the hundreds). His job as a part-time waiter gave him some free time, so in 1996 he purchased the abandoned buildings and yards that now comprise the Mr. Rogers-on-hyperdrive Randyland.
 
"I bought it for 10,000 bucks on a credit card," Randy says. "People said, 'You're a waiter; you don't have any money; what are you gonna do with it?'"
 
Original source: Roadside America
Read the full story here.
 

Pittsburgh's College Prowler triples revenue, expands and rebrands

CNN Money checks in on Pittsburgh-based College Prowler, which is expanding and rebranding.
 
College Prowler founder and CEO Luke Skurman says he thinks the Internet needs more user-generated reviews, which is why he's expanding his 11-year-old user-curated online college guidebook and rebranding it as Niche, a site that allows students and families to grade high schools and will eventually give them the ability to evaluate grade schools, cities, and neighborhoods.
 
Original source: CNNMoney
Read the full story here.

Lights, music, avatar: Why you can't miss Pittsburgh's VIA Festival

Huffington Post compiles nine reasons why you should experience the VIA Festival, the annual music and new media festival born from a creative collective of Pittsburgh's most cutting-edge musicians and visual artists.
 
The entirely volunteer-run fest is six days of A/V showcases, film screenings and live collaborative performances, all uniquely integrated into the city of Pittsburgh. The self-proclaimed "Festival as Laboratory" is constantly experimenting and reinventing the idea of what a festival can be in today's world.
 
"Basically," Goshinski said, "VIA's not something we can best express in words. You just need to experience it."
 
Original source: Huffington Post
Read the full story here.

Pittsburgh among those leading the maker revolution

The Kids Creativity Network, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh and Maker Corps. are among the reasons Pittsburgh is leading the maker revolution, reports CNN.
 
The Elizabeth Forward School District, south of Pittsburgh, is integrating the maker movement into the core of its education mission. The district is "remaking education," transforming traditional classrooms and the library into interactive digital learning labs.

"It helped me learn more, actually," says Alyssa, a junior.
 
Original source: CNN
Read the full story here.

Station to Station public art train stops in Pittsburgh

Wired reports on Station to Station, the barnstorming public art project that made its way to Pittsburgh recently.

The rotunda was roaring. As Station to Station’s latest event got underway last night at Pittsburgh’s Union Station, the crowd members outside were greeted by the deafening approach of the Kansas City Marching Cobras, whose thunderous, sky-high drums (and equally aerial pom-poms) signaled the start of the show. After leading a swell of audience members into the station, they were paired with the swarming guitars and drums of No Age, whose buzzsaw set felt a bit more menacing than it did on Friday in Brooklyn.
 
Original source: Wired
Read the full story here.
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